Current students

2nd Year HESA Students Earn Competition Title

Congratulations to Julia Anderson (‘18) and Lisa Famularo ('18) who successfully won first place in the American College Personnel Association’s (ACPA) 2018 Winter Case Study Competition for graduate students. The competition, which was was sponsored by the ACPA’s Graduate Student and New Professional Community of Practice, brought graduate students from programs across the nation to compete against one another. Students assumed responsibilities as acting members in the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to create an 8-10 minute video which outlined an action plan to address the concerns of a specific transgender student. Through this lens, participants grappled with the treatment transgender students face on campuses nationwide in the current political climate. We caught up with current HESA students Julia and Lisa to talk a little more about the competition. 

The challenge for this competition focused on building an inclusive higher education environment (specifically for trans students). Can you talk about why inclusivity in higher education is so important, and how you’re learning to be inclusive in your practice?

Julia Anderson headshot
Julia Anderson

JA: This case study centered on a trans student who was concerned about her career goals unravelling, and she was also reporting that she was being misgendered by professors on campus. As someone who has worked with students facing similar situations, I am so thankful to work on a campus with a designated resource for LGBTQ+ students. Not all campuses are designed this way, so all student affairs practitioners must be prepared to support all students they encounter. This is a commitment that we must make anew each day – I work to re-commit myself to inclusivity by consistently considering intersections of identity within the LGBTQ+ community.

LF: The years a student spends in college can sometimes be some of the most influential years of their life. Because the primary reason students pursue higher education is typically to learn, it is important for higher education professionals to create and maintain spaces where every student feels comfortable enough to learn; there is nothing more distracting than feeling alienated, unwanted, or uncomfortable. One of the founding values of the field of student affairs is to tend to the whole student, so it is vital that student affairs professionals take the whole student into account when planning programs, events, and services in order to be inclusive and equity-minded. As a young student affairs professional about to fully enter the field, I believe that one of the most powerful equity-minded practices I have learned is challenging the underlying assumptions for each decision that is being made in order to avoid perpetuating assumptions that are biased, inequitable, or wholly incorrect. I believe this practice can and will little-by-little identify and eradicate some of the problematic assumptions and resulting decisions that persist in higher education today.

How did your UConn HESA experience help you with this challenge?

Lisa Famularo

LF: My UConn HESA experience both directly and indirectly gave me the knowledge and skills I needed to be successful in this competition. When putting together our plan to address the issues presented in the case, Julia and I relied on information about student development

theory we learned in our classes, programming/campaign ideas that have proven successful in our assistantships, and the connections we have made with various offices on UConn's campus throughout our time in the HESA Program. In the end, we were successfully able to develop a plan to follow up with a student in crisis, put on support and educational programming, and establish beneficial campus partnerships to work towards a more inclusive campus climate.

JA: I believe that I was equipped to respond to students in crisis by my assistantship in the Rainbow Center. There, I work with students who are encountering difficulties related to their gender identity every day, and we work together to find and enact solutions.

What does this award mean for you and your career goals?

JA: This award was based on our recommendations for a case study about a transgender student who was experiencing difficulties in her personal, professional, and academic life. I am seeking positions in LGBTQ+ services, and my assistantship is in the Rainbow Center, so this award was an affirmation of the work I do each day.

LF: I am proud of achieving first place in this case study competition sponsored by a national organization because it shows that the knowledge and experience I have gained in the UConn HESA Program truly does make me stand out from other graduate students in the field. I plan to pursue a career as either a career counselor or career coach for college students, and in order to do so successfully, I need to be able to work effectively with students from a variety of backgrounds. This case, especially since it was focused on supporting a student with a marginalized identity, was putting my abilities in this regard to the test, and winning first place was an encouraging indication that I am headed in the right direction.

Second Blog Post in Michelle Meek’s Emerging SAPro Series Goes Live

Michelle’s Emerging #SAPro Journey – Entering the Job Search with Collective Support

Editor’s Note: This story, written by Michelle Meek, originally appeared on The Student Affairs Collective on December 18, 2017.

This is the second blog post in Michelle’s monthly Emerging SAPro Series through The Student Affairs Collective. This month’s post is a reflection about making the most of the time spent in grad school and early career positions, in which Michelle shares several bucket list items for my time remaining at UConn and share my strategy for focusing on graduate school while not ignoring the job search.

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Lexy Parrill (’17) received ACUI Gretchen Laatsch Grant and Scholarship

Lexy Parrill received the ACUI Gretchen Laatsch Grant and Scholarship to support the work she completed during my practicum with the Programs Office in Fall 2016. Her proposal focused on Student Union Policy Council and Advisory Board best practices. As a recipient of this grant, she received funding to continue my inquiry project and have been asked to write an article to be Published in the ACUI Bulletin.

Emily Daher (’18) and Ricardo Destinvil (’18) Receive Awards at Annual Neag Scholarship Awards Ceremony

Peter J. Nicholls Scholarship in Educational Leadership

This scholarship was established by friends, family, and colleagues of Dr. Peter J. Nicholls, former Provost of the University of Connecticut. This scholarship provides support to a graduate student(s) enrolled in the Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA) program.

Emily Daher

Neag School of Education Graduate Fellowship

Established thanks to the generosity of numerous faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of the Neag School of Education, this scholarship is awarded to a graduate student identified by nomination in his or her program as having a strong academic performance and having gone above and beyond by contributing significantly to the Neag School.

Ricardo Destinvil

Emily Daher (’18) and Careers for the Common Good Career Fair

Careers for the Common Good Career Fair 2/15/2017 12-3pm, Student Union

– Highest student attendance since 2009 with 347 undergraduate and graduate students

– 79 non-profit and social service agencies in attendance

Careers for the Common Good is a collaborative project by the Office of Community Outreach, Center for Career Development, and Human Rights Institute that supports students in their exploration of socially responsible career paths.

Emily Daher and CCG Interns at CCG Fair

Emily Daher (’18) facilitated and presented at the National Impact Conference

Emily Daher facilitated and presented a workshop at the National Impact Conference at Washington University in Saint Louis, MO. Topic: Pitching Impact: Sharing Your Social Enterprise Ideas. “The IMPACT Conference is historically the largest annual conference focused on the civic engagement of college students in community service, service-learning, community-based research, advocacy and other forms of social action.” Source: